Samuel Taylor Coleridge Study Archive

That the poetic — and I see no reason for doubting the real — date of the Apocalypse is under Vespasian, is so evidently implied in the five kings preceding (for Galba, Otho, and Vitellus, were abortive emperors) that is seems to me quite lawless to deny it.


Samuel Taylor Coleridge
1772 – 1834

MODERN PRETERIST
MASTER POET

REVELATION DATED TO BEFORE AD70 AND FULFILLED THEREIN THROUGH CHAPTER 11



Poetical Works at Google Books | Coleridge’s Intellectual Intuition, the Vision of God, and the Walled Garden of “Kubla Khan” | Coleridge, Kabbalah, and the book of Daniel | Biographical Data

 

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
“I Have already told you that in my opinion the destruction of Jerusalem is the only subject now left for an epic poem of the highest kind. Yet, with all its great capabilities, it has this one grand defect—that, whereas a poem, to be epic, must have a personal interest,—in the destruction of Jerusalem no genius or skill could possibly preserve the interest for the hero from being merged in the interest for the event. The fact is, the event itself is too sublime and overwhelming.” (September 4, 1833.)

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
“The rite of circumcision, I say, was binding on all the descendants of Abraham through Isaac for all time even to the end of the world; but the whole law of Moses was binding on the Jewish Christians till the heaven and the earth–that is, the Jewish priesthood and the state–had passed away in the destruction of the temple and city; and the Apostles observed every tittle of the Law.”


HELD TO MODERN FULFILLED VIEW OF BIBLE PROPHECY

“(Coleridge’s) epic would have employed the historical events of the fall of Jerusalem to show the recreation of the ancient religious constitution of man in the new Jerusalem.”

George Ripley on Samuel Taylor Coleridge – “He also conceived an epic poem on the destruction of Jerusalem, a subject which would interest all Christendom as the siege of Troy interested Greece.” (“The American Cyclopaedia”) : Coleridge: “I Have already told you that in my opinion the destruction of Jerusalem is the only subject now left for an epic poem of the highest kind. Yet, with all its great capabilities, it has this one grand defect—that, whereas a poem, to be epic, must have a personal interest,—in the destruction of Jerusalem no genius or skill could possibly preserve the interest for the hero from being merged in the interest for the event. The fact is, the event itself is too sublime and overwhelming.” (September 4, 1833.)

Thomas Aird (1839)
“The Fall of Jerusalem as a subject for an Epic Poem, it is proudly remarked by Coleridge:—”This subject, with all its great liabilities, has this one grand defect, that, whereas a Poem to be epic must have a personal interest, in the Destruction of Jerusalem a genius or skill could possibly preserve the interest for the hero from being merged in the interest for the event. The fact is, the vent itself is too sublime and overwhelming.” Impressed with the justness of this opinion, and no less conscious of his own want of fitness to take up the subject-matter in its wide extent, even were it free from the fundamental difficulty thus expounded by the critic, the Author of this little poem, Othuriel, has attempted nothing beyond cutting out a story, in a great measure domestic, from the Siege and Fall of the Holy City. He has kept his principal character central in every Canto; and, though he has given a few of the leading circumstances of that Siege and Fall, he has been studious that the fortunes and fate of his hero should be illustrated merely, and not overlaid, by the general calamity. In this way, and this alone, perhaps, such vast quarries of terror and pity as the Destruction of Jerusalem, the French Revolution, &c., may be turned to good account by the poet.” (Othuriel )

F.W. Farrar
“FARRAR, FREDERIC WILLIAM 
(1831-1903), English divine, was born on the 7th of August 1831, in the Fort of Bombay, where his father, afterwards vicar of Sidcup, Kent, was then a missionary. His early education was received in King Williams College, Castletown, Isle of Man, a school whose external surroundings are- reproduced in his popular schoolboy tale, Eric; or, Little by Little. In 1847 he entered Kings College, London.. Through the influence of F.D. Maurice he was led to the study of Coleridge, whose writings had a profound influence upon his faith and opinions.” (1911 Encyclopedia )

Ephraim Gerber (1999)
“COLERIDGE: Darker Reflections by Richard Holmes. New York, Random House/Pantheon Books. 622 pp. $32.   In mid-1815, hopelessly behind on the publication deadline for the Biographia Literaria but feverishly adding chapter after chapter (while expanding and interlarding the existing ones), mind and body suffering under the insult of his opium addiction, Coleridge dictated the following words to his friend John Morgan: “By what I have effected, am I to be judged by my fellow men; what I could have done is a question for others.” (Jerusalem Post 07-30-1999)

F.D. Maurice
“wrote several articles, attacking Bentham and praising writers including Samuel Taylor Coleridge; contributed to the Westminster Review, 1827-1828; contributed to and then edited the newly-launched Athenaeum, 1828; entered Exeter College Oxford, 1830; baptised in Church of England, 1831; took a second class degree, 1831; ordained to the curacy of Bubbenhall, near Leamington, 1834; his novel Eustace Conway, begun c1830 and published in 1834, was praised by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, although they never met” (King’s College London Archives)

Thomas Rattray
“The Apostle, with all the spiritually minded of his day, desired to live to the day of Christ. They had ever ” the intense desire for the return,” and “being with Christ.” It was to them a veritable enthusiasm, and not a mad fanaticism. It was as Coleridge has it, ” A true Christian enthusiasm, the vivifying influences of the altar, the censer, and the sacrifice,” and I may add, the completion of these in the regal advent of Him, at whose kingly presence, the altar, and the censer, and the sacrifice—the divine agencies of worship and mediation in the night season of Judiasm, as the stars in the firmament pale and vanish before the rising sun, so these lesser lights would fade from the vision before the Sun of righteousness which was about to arise, ” with healing in his wings.”

The Swedenborg Society (2004)
“The leading Romantic poet, critic and philosopher was a keen reader of Swedenborg. Hazlitt records that the young Coleridge ‘walked hand in hand with Swedenborg through the pavilions of the New Jerusalem and sang his faith in the promise and in the word in his “Religious Musings”’. Later in life, having formed a close friendship with the Swedenborgian Charles Augustus Tulk, Coleridge made a deep study of several of Swedenborg’s works, including The Economy of the Animal KingdomThe Worship and Love of GodDivine Love and Wisdom and The True Christian Religion. He offered to write a ‘Life of the Mind of Swedenborg’ for the Swedenborg Society, but the offer was not accepted. He wrote that as a moralist ‘Swedenborg is above all praise; and that as a naturalist, psychologist, and theologian he has strong and varied claims on the gratitude and admiration of the professional and philosophical student’.” (HJ Jackson, ”Swedenborg’s Meaning is the truth’: Coleridge, Tulk, and Swedenborg’ in In Search of the Absolute: Essays on Swedenborg and Literature).

Review of Kubla Khan
Dr Schaffer outlines the development of the mythological school of European Biblical criticism, especially its German origins and its reception in England, and studies the influence of this movement in the work of specific writers: Coleridge Hlderlin, Browning, and George Eliot. The higher criticism treated sacred scripture as literature and as history, as the product of its time, and the highest expression of a developing group consciousness; it challenged current views on the authorship and dating of the Pentateuch and the Gospels, on inspiration, prophecy, and canonicity, and formulated a new apologetics closely linked with the growth of Romantic aesthetics. The importance of this study is that it shows that readings of specific literary texts can intersect with general movements of thought and action through the scrutiny of a clearly defined intellectual discipline, here the higher criticism, which developed as a particular expression of the larger trends in the history of the period. Dr Shaffer throws light on individual works of literature, the formation between England and Germany, and the bases of European Romanticism.” (“Book: ‘kubla Khan’ And The Fall Of Jerusalem – The Mythological School In Biblical Criticism And Secular Literature 1770–1880 )


Bibliography

By Coleridge

  • The Poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Introduction) Oxford University Press 1912
  • The Collected Works in 16 volumes (some are double volumes), many editors, Routledge & Kegan Paul and also Bollingen Series LXXV, Princeton University Press (1971-2001)
  • The Notebooks in 5 (or 6) double volumes, eds. Kathleen Coburn and others, Routledge and also Bollingen Series L, Princeton University Press (1957-1990)
  • Collected Letters in 6 volumes, ed. E. L. Griggs, Clarendon Press: Oxford (1956-1971)

About Coleridge

  • Essay by John Stuart Mill: On Coleridge
  • Biography by Richard Holmes: Coleridge: Early Visions, Viking Penguin: New York, 1990 (republished later by HarperCollins) ISBN 0-375-70540-6; Coleridge: Darker Reflections, HarperCollins: London, 1997 ISBN 0-375-70838-3
  • Memoir by Thomas de Quincey: Recollections of the Lakes and the Lake Poets ISBN 0-14-043973-0

Related to Coleridge

  • Science fiction by Douglas Adams: Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency ISBN 0-671-74672-3
  • Fantasy by Tim Powers: The Anubis Gates

“to begin by loving Christianity more than truth results in one loving their own denomination over Christianity.”

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